Tundra Information:


Quick Annual Stats:
Temperature0°F to 50°F
Rainfall10 inches or less
Dewpointsummer: > 50°F, winter < 50°F
Soilpoor and rocky
The tundra is a biome of low-growing plants that cannot grow higher than the snow depth. It is found in the northernmost land masses of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alpine tundra, at the tops of tall mountains, is found on nearly all continents with mountains that range above 10,000 feet altitude. Soils are often rocky and poor. Permafrost occurs in the northern tundras where the soil is permanently frozen, except for the surface during the summer. Temperatures are mild during the summer and the growing season is short, often less than 10 weeks. Winters are brutally cold with blowing snow and ice. The winds are desiccatingly dry and destroy most exposed vegetation. The northern tundras have low sunlight availability while alpine tundras may have the opposite, being closer to the equator. Rainfall is low, with annual totals usually less than 10 inches (25 cm). Major producers include small succulent (thick-leaved) plants, often resembling cacti. Small plants of the aster, figwort, and pea family are common. Animals include insects, elk, caribou, grizzly bear, goats, many birds, and rodents, such as marmots.



The tundra of the high country of Grand Teton National Park.
By skuensting


The tundra and tree line of Grand Teton National Park.
By skuensting


Tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park.
By skuensting


The view off Mount Evans of the Chicago lakes. Note how far the above the treeline the hiker is...
By skuensting


Tundra, Grand Teton National Park.
By skuensting


Mountain goat, Glacier National Park.
By skuensting


Ground squirrel (like prairie dog), Glacier National Park.
By skuensting

Tundra Distribution Map

By Katpatuka (talk · contribs) (This file was derived from Blank-Map-World.png:) [FAL], via Wikimedia Commons